Map the Meal Gap Food Insecurity Data

 
 


Feeding America Map the Meal Gap

Feeding America's Map the Meal Gap project seeks to learn more about the face of hunger at the local community level.  Feeding America has published Map the Meal Gap data since 2009, with support from the Howard G. Buffett Foundation, ConAgra Food Foundation and The Nielsen Company, to learn more about food security at the local community level.  The annual study measures the population affected by food insecurity and the factors that contribute to need in households across the country, including weekly food-budget shortfalls, demographics, poverty levels and unemployment rates.

Historically, the number of people falling below the federal poverty threshold has been used to identify the need for food at the local level because it is one of the few indicators available at the county level.  However, national food insecurity data reveal that about 45% of those struggling with hunger actually have incomes above the Federal Poverty Level ($23,550 for a family of four in 2013), and 53% of poor households do not suffer from food insecurity.  Thus, measuring need based on poverty alone does not accurately capture everyone who is struggling with hunger.

NEW: 2013 Data (released April, 2015):  Once again, almost 1 in 5 Arizonans (17.5%), or 1.16 million people, struggled with food insecurity in 2013.  Children are disproportionally affected: more than 1 in 4 Arizona children (28.0% – an estimated 454,460) suffered from food insecurity in that same time period. Arizona’s struggles with food insecurity exceed national averages:  nationwide, the food insecurity rate was 15.8%.  By county, Apache County had the highest rate of food insecurity at 28.2% while Greenlee County had the lowest rate at 14.4%. When a household suffers from food insecurity, it means they may lack access to or the ability to afford enough food to feed their household.

Map the Meal Gap also breaks down food insecurity rates by county and Congressional District, providing an estimate of how much money it would take to make everyone food secure.  Food insecurity by Arizona Congressional District:

District Representative Overall Food Insecurity Child Food Insecurity
1 Kirkpatrick 20.3% 32.5%
2 McSally 18.1% 27.7%
3 Grijalva 16.0% 29.5%
4 Gosar 18.9% 30.0%
5 Salmon 14.3% 21.4%
6 Schweikert 16.5% 24.0%
7 Gallego 20.1% 35.1%
8 Franks 15.2% 23.4%
9 Sinema 18.5% 27.6%

View the Interactive Map the Meal Gap map: Interactive maps for Arizona, the US, by County & Congressional District

2012 Data (released April, 2014):  Almost 1 in 5 Arizonans (17.8%), or 1.17 million people, struggled with food insecurity in 2012.  More alarmingly, more than 1 in 4 Arizona children (28.2% – an estimated 456,760) also suffered from food insecurity in that same time period. Arizona’s struggles with food insecurity exceed national averages:  nationwide, the food insecurity rate was 15.9%.  By county, Apache County had the highest rate of food insecurity at 25.7% while Pinal County had the lowest rate at 15.3%.

2011 Data (released June, 2013):  In Arizona, an estimated 19.1% (more than 1.23 million people) are suffering from food insecurity, or the inability to provide enough food to feed the household. Yuma County (27.3%) had the highest rate of food insecurity, followed by Apache County (26.1%) and Navajo County (22.7%).  By comparison, Maricopa County was 16.2% food insecure and Pima County was 16.6% food insecure, while Pinal County had the lowest food insecurity rate at 15.9%. 

2010 Data (released April, 2012):  In Arizona, an estimated 19.0% (more than 1.21 million people) suffered from food insecurity.  Apache and Yuma Counties (27.1%) tied for the highest rates of food insecurity, with Navajo County (23.9%) coming in third. By comparison, Maricopa County is 16.1% and Pima County is 16.4% food insecure. By Congressional District, District 4 (24.1%), District 1 (21.6%) and District 7 (20.7%) have the highest food insecurity rates, while District 8 (16.4%) has the lowest rate of food insecurity.

2009 data (released March, 2011):  In Arizona, an estimated 17.4% (more than 1.1 million people) suffered from food insecurity.  Apache County (28.5%), Yuma County (27.9%) and Navajo County (24.5%) have the highest rates of food insecurity in Arizona. By comparison, Maricopa County is 16.2% and Pima County is 17.0% food insecure. By Congressional District, District 4 (24.7%), District 7 (21.3%) and District 1 (19.2%) have the highest food insecurity rates.